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Open Access Research

The potential role of microfilaments in host cells for infection with infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus infection

Kun-tong Jia12, Zhao-yu Liu2, Chang-jun Guo1*, Qiong Xia2, Shu Mi2, Xiao-Dong Li2, Shao-ping Weng2 and Jian-guo He12

Author Affiliations

1 MOE Key Laboratory of Aquatic Product Safety/State Key Laboratory for Biocontrol, School of Marine Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, 135 Xingang Road West, Guangzhou, 510275, PR China

2 State Key Laboratory for Biocontrol, School of Life Sciences, Sun Yat-sen University, 135 Xingang Road West, Guangzhou, 510275, PR China

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Virology Journal 2013, 10:77  doi:10.1186/1743-422X-10-77

Published: 7 March 2013

Abstract

Background

Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus (ISKNV) belongs to the genus Megalocytivirus from the family Iridoviridae. Megalocytivirus causes severe economic losses to tropical freshwater and marine culture industry in Asian countries and is devastating to the mandarin fish farm industry in China particularly.

Methods

We investigated the involvement of microfilaments in the early and late stages of ISKNV infection in MFF-1 cells by selectively perturbing their architecture using well-characterized inhibitors of actin dynamics. The effect of disruption of actin cytoskeleton on ISKNV infection was evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence analysis or real-time quantitative PCR.

Results

The depolymerization of the actin filaments with cytochalasin D, cytochalasin B, or latrunculin A reduced ISKNV infection. Furthermore, depolymerization of filamentous actin by inhibitors did not inhibit binding of the virus but affected virus internalization in the early stages of infection. In addition, the depolymerization of actin filaments reduced total ISKNV production in the late stages of ISKNV.

Conclusions

This study demonstrated that ISKNV required an intact actin network during infection. The findings will help us to better understand how iridoviruses exploit the cytoskeleton to facilitate their infection and subsequent disease.

Keywords:
Iridovirus; Infectious spleen and kidney necrosis virus; Microfilaments